We are closing out a 10-year cycle of becoming that began in 2010. We have been letting go of who we thought we were and starting to chart a new course.

Most people wait until the second or third act of life to assess their legacy. But what if we were to structure our decisions right now based on how we want to be remembered.

Every one of us is born with a purpose – a special role in humanity. In the dawn of a new decade, what better time to put some intentionality around what brings you energy and that which no longer serves you. Why not carve out some alone time to go for a walk in nature and reflect on:

  • What were your best / peak moments of the past 10 years?
  • Where did you fail (spectacularly)?
  • What are you most proud of?
  • What do you want to leave in this 10-year cycle?
  • What do you want to carry forward?

No doubt much has happened these past 10 years – just look how far you have come. The beauty of purpose is that it is dynamic and continues to be applied throughout our lives. No matter how far we stray away from ourselves, there is always a path back. Everything that happens to us is a means to help us evolve into who we are meant to become. We move in the direction of the life for which we are intended.

In a world that seems ever more complex, it is time for us to reconnect with our humanity. Purpose is not about acquiring anything – it is about becoming. It is the possibility of change through shedding layers and becoming more consciousness, more compassionate…more you.

Years ago, Oprah Winfrey interviewed a grieving mother whose adult son had died following a long illness. You could have heard a pin drop in the studio when the mother recounted the story of their final moment together. The mother had climbed into bed with her son. She could barely hear him, but her head was on his chest. As he took his last breath, he whispered, “Oh Mom, it is all so simple. It’s so simple Mom.” He then closed his eyes and died.

Becoming is simple. 

For centuries, the First Nation and Native American people of the Wabanaki Confederation had to literally carry their homes on their backs whenever they had to migrate. Known as ‘portaging’, it refers to carrying a canoe or boat and all its contents across land from one body of water to another. Portaging then partly refers to the process of choosing what to take and what to leave behind as one makes the journey forward in life.

What a beautiful concept – to only carry forward that which serves your highest good.

My hope is that you drop anything that weighs you down – needless doubt, perfectionism, entangled relationships – whatever it may be.

In between the currents of these two decades, what do you choose to leave behind? Your answer to that question is the next step in your path.

Imagine what lies just around the bend. Can you see it? I can.

Love

Samie